STOP HR 475 - Protect Veterans Post 9/11 GI Bill Benefits

If passed, 1000s of Veterans immediately impacted by loss of Educational Benefits.

This Bill discriminates against Veterans wishing to use their benefits to become professional pilots.



Don't be fooled by its name, House Bill HR 475 titled: "GI Bill Processing Improvement Act of 2015" will eliminate the opportunity for Veterans to become professional pilots after serving their Country and earning their Post 9/11 GI Bill Benefits.



If passed, HR 475 "Prohibits VA from including flight training fees in the in-state tuition and fees at public institutions of higher education (IHEs) that are covered by post-9/11 veterans' educational assistance."



See https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-congress/house-bill/475



This bill places an immediate CAP of $20,000 on the ANNUAL, TOTAL tuition & fees covered by the Post 9/11 GI Bill by including PUBLIC as well as private colleges in the annual CAP!



These effects are immediate and will apply to ALL current and FUTURE Veterans who wish to use their earned benefits to become professional pilots. Moreover, Veterans currently enrolled in Flight Training will lose their funding.



PLEASE HELP - TELL YOUR FRIENDS. SIGN THE PETITION!

CALL YOUR REPRESENTATIVE - TELL THEM TO STOP HR 475.



Please comment (respectfully) on - Bill Sponsor - Congressman Wenstrup's Blog

http://wenstrup.house.gov/news/documentsingle.aspx?DocumentID=398694



Visit and "Like" the Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Stop-HR-476-Protect-Veterans-Post-911-Benefits/1552287895036776

Take Action! First, Enter Your ZIP Code


Public Comments (7,815)
Dec 13th, 2017
Colin H. from Ventura, CA writes:
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Our Veterans deserve higher education opportunities after all they fought for the right for everyone in this country to have them!
Nov 14th, 2017
Mike S. from Palm Coast, FL writes:
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The following communique was sent to my congressional representatives a month or so ago. I'm posting it here in the hope that: (1) it might inspire others to do likewise, and (2) to solicit feedback if my take on matter gives rise to questions or counter positions. ____________________ This message is coming to you from a Florida resident, Air Force veteran, and on-call staffer with FAPA.aero, an Internet entity focused on helping pilots of all experience levels achieve their flying career goals. I am writing in hopes of addressing your attention to H.R. 3016: The Veterans Employment, Education, and Healthcare Improvement Act (specifically Title III, Section 306 thereof), and the earlier GI Bill Education Quality Enhancement Act of 2015 (H.R. 476). Reportedly referred to the U.S. Senate Committee on Veterans Affairs on 02/10/2016, H.R. 3016, if passed, would derail the plans of untold numbers of military personal and veterans who thought that they were, or hoped to become, securely established on a preparatory track leading to the fulfillment of their flying career aspirations. Scores of the affected student population are enrolled in Florida’s four public professional pilot (pro-pilot) degree-offering institutions of higher learning (IHLs). Hundreds of pro-pilot degree-seeking military personnel/veterans in over 40 other states will be similarly impacted. H.R. 3016 proposes to slash Post-9/11 GI Bill education benefits nation-wide by more than $800 million over ten years, and impose a $20,235 annual VA tuition and flight training benefit cap. Although these funding limits are unlikely to significantly impact veterans’ ability to pay their tuition and incidental fees, they would fall woefully short with respect to their degree-required flight training assessments. Currently these variable-by-institution five-six digit charges can be reduced by 40-100 percent under existing Post-9/11 GI Bill provisions. Such cost-saving measures are not included in the above-cited congressional bills. Persons aspiring to most entry-level airline pilot positions usually must possess at least an Associate Degree and a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)-issued Restricted Airline Transport Pilot (RATP) Certificate. While the academic hiring prerequisite can sometimes be waived or met by the completion of virtually any regionally accredited college degree program, FAA RATP certification requires a minimum of 1,500 hours of specified aeronautical experience. If the pilot job seeker is a graduate of an FAA-approved two- or four-year pro-pilot college degree program, total flight time minimums can be significantly reduced. These RATP qualification adjustments are moot, however, for military personal and veterans that, absent VA funding support, cannot afford the afore-mentioned flight training costs. The pro-pilot career pathway disruption imposed by H.R. 3016/476 also threatens to eventually impinge on the nation’s airlines--an industry that, according to Boeing Commercial Airplane Company forecasts, will require 112,000 pilots in North America alone during the 2016-2036 time period. Historically, military trained aviators have been a reliable, if not preferred, “go-to” source of new airline pilot hires. This demographic is changing, however, as fewer mid-career military pilots are understandably loath to leave the service to pursue a civilian flying position. As a result, the current airline pilot accession pipeline is becoming increasingly civilian source-focused, and the major players in this newly emerging scenario are the nation’s pro-pilot degree-offering IHLs. The above developments appear to be giving rise to two potentially troubling and interdependent human resource demands: the airlines’ need for a reliable conduit of entry-level IHL-prepared pilots, and academia’s need for adequate pro-pilot program-sustaining enrollments. The fulfillment of either requirement is questionable if the Senate concurs with the above-mentioned House of Representative proposals. The issues prompting the radical Post-9/11 GI Bill benefit cut-backs warrant careful deliberation by a select bipartisan committee of affected academic, governmental and airline industry stakeholders. If changes to the proposed legislative changes are subsequently deemed to be in order, hopefully they will at least be consensus-based and less damaging to the futures of those that have devoted a significant portion of their productive years to our nation’s defense. Please add your voice/vote in support of our country’s pro-pilot degree-seeking military personnel and veterans, and public aviation program-offering colleges that, together, are critical components in ongoing efforts to insure that our national air transportation industry’s next generation personnel requirements are met!
Oct 17th, 2017
MALLORY M. from Ojai, CA signed.
Oct 17th, 2017
MALLORY M. from Ojai, CA signed.
Oct 5th, 2017
Someone from Ventura, CA signed.
Aug 29th, 2017
Someone from Thousand Oaks, CA writes:
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Our military men and women deserve the opportunity to have good jobs after they serve and give us all the freedom we take for granted.
Aug 16th, 2017
Shelly F. from Santa Ana, CA writes:
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This is just not a Fair thing to do for all those who have Worked so hard to Fight for our Country and for those who are just starting their Career in the Military!
Jul 13th, 2017
Nicole M. from Sacramento, CA writes:
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We need to do everything we can to give our soldiers the opportunity to have good jobs after they serve. Don't discount their experience gained serving our country!
Jul 13th, 2017
Nicole M. from Sacramento, CA writes:
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We need to do everything we can to give our soldiers the opportunity to have good jobs after they serve. Don't discount their experience gained serving our country!
Jul 10th, 2017
Someone from Oxnard, CA writes:
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I am a veteran, and a single mom. Without the Post 911 GI Bill I wouldn't have been able to get my bachelors degree nor the career that is taking care of my child. My brothers and sisters are dying and we are trying to put another limit on those that come home to get an education??!! Really!? That is their/our entitlement! Just ridiculous!

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