Being Bilingual in Spanish a discrimination against job seekers

Bilingual in spanish or any other language shouldnt be a qualification unless its a translator job, oppurtunity for all

Bilingual in Spanish or any other language shouldnt be a requirement in a job unles sits a translator job, if its a skilled job like Nursing, banking, teaching (general), engineer, lab tech, health, I dont need to be able to be fluent or speak spanish, since my primary job isnt to speak spanish but my skill.



It is discrimatory, against non speakers , it is not a skill to speak Spanish uless it is a translator job.

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Public Comments (2,311)
2 days ago
Someone from Rancho Santa Margarita, CA writes:
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I applied at major corporations in the last 6 months since I am unemployed. I am applying for a warehouse operations position which I have over 25 years experience in. I even have a Masters Degree. I served my country in the armed forces. I am being asked if I am fluent in spanish at every job and turned down when I say no. I took spanish in school. The spanosh spoken in California is not even proper spanish. Its all slang. Why dont companies require people to learn english? Why am I the one descriminated against. My wife was an immigrant and she had to prove she spoke fluent english to go to grad school here. She is now an American Citizen. Stop this giving of spanish speakers all this power. I am qualified to do a job. I cant get hired since I speak only my native language. Why dont they learn English! Lets make america Great Again! God Bless America! Remember the Alamo! Remember 911!
May 3rd, 2019
Someone from Las Cruces, NM writes:
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After 6 months of living in New Mexico, I’m ready to move. I’ve been unable to find employment as a receptionist or office support (even though this is the foundation of my experience and I have an Associate Degree). I’m unable to find jobs outside of my skill set, such as retail or food service, because they think I won’t stay due to my being “over qualified”. Employers are getting around the laws by saying “bilingual/Spanish preferred”. This should not be allowed, and it should not be allowed to be a question at a job interview as asking if I speak Spanish which basically has then disqualified me. Unless the job is for an interpreter or all Hispanic clientele, Spanish as a second language should not be a consideration for employers in the United States at all as it creates not only employment issues and reverse discrimination but created additional issues with immigration by catering to those who come here and refuse to speak English (something that was not acceptable when my ancestors and father came here).
May 3rd, 2019
Someone from Las Cruces, NM writes:
Quotation mark icon
After 6 months of living in New Mexico, I’m ready to move. I’ve been unable to find employment as a receptionist or office support (even though this is the foundation of my experience and I have an Associate Degree). I’m unable to find jobs outside of my skill set, such as retail or food service, because they think I won’t stay due to my being “over qualified”. Employers are getting around the laws by saying “bilingual/Spanish preferred”. This should not be allowed, and it should not be allowed to be a question at a job interview as asking if I speak Spanish which basically has then disqualified me. Unless the job is for an interpreter or all Hispanic clientele, Spanish as a second language should not be a consideration for employers in the United States at all as it creates not only employment issues and reverse discrimination but created additional issues with immigration by catering to those who come here and refuse to speak English (something that was not acceptable when my ancestors and father came here).
May 3rd, 2019
Someone from Las Cruces, NM writes:
Quotation mark icon
After 6 months of living in New Mexico, I’m ready to move. I’ve been unable to find employment as a receptionist or office support (even though this is the foundation of my experience and I have an Associate Degree). I’m unable to find jobs outside of my skill set, such as retail or food service, because they think I won’t stay due to my being “over qualified”. Employers are getting around the laws by saying “bilingual/Spanish preferred”. This should not be allowed, and it should not be allowed to be a question at a job interview as asking if I speak Spanish which basically has then disqualified me. Unless the job is for an interpreter or all Hispanic clientele, Spanish as a second language should not be a consideration for employers in the United States at all as it creates not only employment issues and reverse discrimination but created additional issues with immigration by catering to those who come here and refuse to speak English (something that was not acceptable when my ancestors and father came here).
May 3rd, 2019
Someone from Las Cruces, NM writes:
Quotation mark icon
After 6 months of living in New Mexico, I’m ready to move. I’ve been unable to find employment as a receptionist or office support (even though this is the foundation of my experience and I have an Associate Degree). I’m unable to find jobs outside of my skill set, such as retail or food service, because they think I won’t stay due to my being “over qualified”. Employers are getting around the laws by saying “bilingual/Spanish preferred”. This should not be allowed, and it should not be allowed to be a question at a job interview as asking if I speak Spanish which basically has then disqualified me. Unless the job is for an interpreter or all Hispanic clientele, Spanish as a second language should not be a consideration for employers in the United States at all as it creates not only employment issues and reverse discrimination but created additional issues with immigration by catering to those who come here and refuse to speak English (something that was not acceptable when my ancestors and father came here).
May 3rd, 2019
Someone from Las Cruces, NM writes:
Quotation mark icon
After 6 months of living in New Mexico, I’m ready to move. I’ve been unable to find employment as a receptionist or office support (even though this is the foundation of my experience and I have an Associate Degree). I’m unable to find jobs outside of my skill set, such as retail or food service, because they think I won’t stay due to my being “over qualified”. Employers are getting around the laws by saying “bilingual/Spanish preferred”. This should not be allowed, and it should not be allowed to be a question at a job interview as asking if I speak Spanish which basically has then disqualified me. Unless the job is for an interpreter or all Hispanic clientele, Spanish as a second language should not be a consideration for employers in the United States at all as it creates not only employment issues and reverse discrimination but created additional issues with immigration by catering to those who come here and refuse to speak English (something that was not acceptable when my ancestors and father came here).
May 3rd, 2019
Someone from Las Cruces, NM writes:
Quotation mark icon
After 6 months of living in New Mexico, I’m ready to move. I’ve been unable to find employment as a receptionist or office support (even though this is the foundation of my experience and I have an Associate Degree). I’m unable to find jobs outside of my skill set, such as retail or food service, because they think I won’t stay due to my being “over qualified”. Employers are getting around the laws by saying “bilingual/Spanish preferred”. This should not be allowed, and it should not be allowed to be a question at a job interview as asking if I speak Spanish which basically has then disqualified me. Unless the job is for an interpreter or all Hispanic clientele, Spanish as a second language should not be a consideration for employers in the United States at all as it creates not only employment issues and reverse discrimination but created additional issues with immigration by catering to those who come here and refuse to speak English (something that was not acceptable when my ancestors and father came here).
May 3rd, 2019
Someone from Las Cruces, NM writes:
Quotation mark icon
After 6 months of living in New Mexico, I’m ready to move. I’ve been unable to find employment as a receptionist or office support (even though this is the foundation of my experience and I have an Associate Degree). I’m unable to find jobs outside of my skill set, such as retail or food service, because they think I won’t stay due to my being “over qualified”. Employers are getting around the laws by saying “bilingual/Spanish preferred”. This should not be allowed, and it should not be allowed to be a question at a job interview as asking if I speak Spanish which basically has then disqualified me. Unless the job is for an interpreter or all Hispanic clientele, Spanish as a second language should not be a consideration for employers in the United States at all as it creates not only employment issues and reverse discrimination but created additional issues with immigration by catering to those who come here and refuse to speak English (something that was not acceptable when my ancestors and father came here).
May 3rd, 2019
Someone from Las Cruces, NM writes:
Quotation mark icon
After 6 months of living in New Mexico, I’m ready to move. I’ve been unable to find employment as a receptionist or office support (even though this is the foundation of my experience and I have an Associate Degree). I’m unable to find jobs outside of my skill set, such as retail or food service, because they think I won’t stay due to my being “over qualified”. Employers are getting around the laws by saying “bilingual/Spanish preferred”. This should not be allowed, and it should not be allowed to be a question at a job interview as asking if I speak Spanish which basically has then disqualified me. Unless the job is for an interpreter or all Hispanic clientele, Spanish as a second language should not be a consideration for employers in the United States at all as it creates not only employment issues and reverse discrimination but created additional issues with immigration by catering to those who come here and refuse to speak English (something that was not acceptable when my ancestors and father came here).
May 3rd, 2019
Someone from Las Cruces, NM writes:
Quotation mark icon
After 6 months of living in New Mexico, I’m ready to move. I’ve been unable to find employment as a receptionist or office support (even though this is the foundation of my experience and I have an Associate Degree). I’m unable to find jobs outside of my skill set, such as retail or food service, because they think I won’t stay due to my being “over qualified”. Employers are getting around the laws by saying “bilingual/Spanish preferred”. This should not be allowed, and it should not be allowed to be a question at a job interview as asking if I speak Spanish which basically has then disqualified me. Unless the job is for an interpreter or all Hispanic clientele, Spanish as a second language should not be a consideration for employers in the United States at all as it creates not only employment issues and reverse discrimination but created additional issues with immigration by catering to those who come here and refuse to speak English (something that was not acceptable when my ancestors and father came here).

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