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CONGRESS AND THE SENATE SHOULD RECEIVE CUTS TO THEIR BENEFITS, NOT THE NEEDY

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While members of Congress receive excellent pay,health care, and expensive perks and benefits, they target the needy and want to make devastating cuts to programs like SNAP (food stamps), and "Meals On Wheels", that millions of citizens depend upon to put food on the table. They also want to make cuts to Social Security and Medicare, that we have paid for out of every paycheck.

They want to make budget cuts that will hurt the most needy individuals, yet they do not go without. Most Americans have experienced pay cuts. Members of Congress and the Senate should also give themselves a paycut, be forced to change health care benefits, and receive the same benefits under the Affordable Health Care Act as everyone else. They should be forced to forfeit pensions, and eliminate, or make cuts to perks and other benefits they reap, if they are truly concerned with saving the government money, and decreasing the deficit.

Here is a list of the perks and benefits they receive:

1. Free parking spaces at the airport in Washington, D.C.

2. A generous pension, which is guaranteed to all members of Congress and the Senate if they have held office for 5 years or more. They also are entitled to Social Security benefits. They should be forced to forfeit this pension, and receive only Social Security benefits like everyone else!

In addition to this pension, Speaker of the House John Boehner will receive an additional $1 million per year, for up to 5 years, after he leaves office, "to facilitate the administration, settlement and conclusion of matters, pertaining to, or arising out of" his tenure as Speaker of the House. This provision will also allow him to rack up huge bills, to "archive" and document materials related to his time in office.

3. Senators get to shop at the equivalent of Congress' IKEA, furniture supplied through the Architect of the Capitol. Every senator gets $40,000, and potentially more, for furniture in their home-state offices.

4. Members of Congress can deduct up to $3,000 for expenses while outside their home districts or states.

Taxpayers are paying for all of this! Time for Congress and the Senate to make cuts to their own salaries and benefits, to decrease government spending and the deficit!

I demand that my elected officials in the Senate and Congress look elsewhere to make budget cuts, starting with their own paycheck, health insurance and other perks and benefits they receive, instead of targeting the poor, elderly and disabled. If they expect others to go without, it's time they did also!

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17 hours ago
Someone from Independence, KY signed.
17 hours ago
Someone from Fenton, MO writes:
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Agree, Congress and Senate should receive same insurance and only ss like average Americans who pay for all of this. They only work around 101 days to start and average starting salary is around 174k. Ridiculous. Also no more subsidies to hollywood. Strip obamacare and penalties. Let us get actual insurance that we can afford and use without sky high deductibles which then makes it where you can't use.
1 day ago
Someone from s h, FL writes:
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Americans demand the same healthcare as Congress. Congress does not earn a paycheck from hardworking taxpayers. Daily Comment On Health Care, We’ll Have What Congress Is Having By Jeffrey Frank January 17, 2017 In the fall of 1994, the Clinton Administration’s much debated comprehensive, and complicated, health-insurance bill—known derisively as Hillarycare—died quietly on Capitol Hill. It was a moment that, the Princeton sociologist Paul Starr later argued, would “go down as one of the great lost political opportunities in American history.” But, before the end, talk of another approach kept bubbling up: to allow those Americans who couldn’t get insurance elsewhere to buy a policy that was just as good, and inexpensive, as what members of Congress got. When Senator Edward M. Kennedy, of Massachusetts, said that Americans should get “exactly what we have,” he meant the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program. The F.E.H.B.P., as it’s known, was started in 1959, a few years before Medicare, and was meant to cover some nine million government employees—civil-service workers, the courts, the Post Office, members of Congress, and more. It wasn’t a single plan but, rather, as a Times story put it, “a supermarket offering 300 private health plans.” (Even the right-learning Heritage Foundation called it “a showcase of consumer choice and free-market competition.”) One may get a sense of its scope and inclusiveness—its supermarket-ness—in the way that the Office of Personnel Management, which administers the program, explains it to federal employees. Much of the program—for instance, the idea that no one can be refused, or charged more, for a preëxisting condition, or that dependents under twenty-six are covered—will sound familiar to anyone conversant with the most attractive parts of the Affordable Care Act. In the summer of 1994, when the Clinton Administration struggled to win approval for its proposal, there were some signs of actual good will in Congress, along with the predictable determination to dynamite the whole idea. Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan, a New York Democrat, wanted any insurer who sold policies to federal workers to offer the same thing to “civilians,” at a reasonable price. Bob Dole, a Kansas Republican and the Minority Leader, favored a scheme in which self-employed individuals and small businesses (employers of up to fifty workers) could buy the federal policy “at the same premium price.” There were several variations of this approach. Then it all went bad, as it had gone bad since the days of the New Deal. Newt Gingrich, who was then the deputy Minority Leader of the House, warned President Clinton that he was endangering his entire agenda in the pursuit of health-care reform—in particular, Gingrich insisted that Clinton was risking a global trade agreement that was probably never in danger. (Someone probably can still explain that era’s excitement over the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, or GATT.) Dole by then had given up, and so had Congressman John Dingell, of Michigan, a Democrat, who had been pushing health-care reform since 1955 but eventually said that it was “time to give health-care reform a decent burial and provide for its rebirth.” Two months later, in the midterm elections, Democrats, although they managed to cling to the Senate, lost the House by the widest margin since the midterms of 1946; Gingrich was elected Speaker on the strength of his “Contract with America,” which made a number of promises that were impossible to keep, and in the process launched an era of rabid partisanship. The failure of health-care reform showed mostly that Democrats were a pushover party, with few sounding like Senator Bob Kerrey, of Nebraska, who said, “I’m not elected to read the polls and say the public wants me to give up.” The “rebirth” for which Dingell hoped would only come a decade and a half later, with the passage, in 2010, of the Affordable Care Act. For all its flaws, bumbled launch, and absence of Republican support, the A.C.A. has provided health insurance to some twenty million Americans who didn’t have it before. Republicans have been venomously eager to dismantle it ever since. Late last week, the Senate took a big step in that direction by passing a budget “blueprint” that will make it easy for Congress, controlled by Republicans, to repeal the act. If it’s sometimes hard to understand what makes Republican legislators so angry, here is a theory: their fury may not stem from some ungraspable principle, or hatred of President Obama’s historic victory (or of Obama himself), but, rather, from something personal, and selfish. Under the A.C.A., members of Congress, and congressional staff, among other Capitol Hill employees, were no longer eligible for the F.E.H.B.P. In the chilly language of government directives, the Office of Personnel Management Web site said that “Section 1312 of the Affordable Care Act requires that Members of Congress and their official staff obtain coverage by health plans created under the Affordable Care Act or coverage offered via an Affordable Insurance Exchange.” Ouch! In other words, the comfortable choices that were available for more than fifty years were suddenly transferred to the slightly murky passageways of Obamacare. And it follows that, if the Affordable Care Act is repealed, members of Congress would be able to return to the federal plan that they, like millions of federal employees, were so fond of. Twenty million other Americans won’t. A better idea, though, might be to find a path (it won’t be easy, but it’s certainly easier than anything else that might be effective and that hundreds of legislators could ever agree upon) to finally offer the beloved, and by most accounts well-administered, federal plan to the rest of the uninsured nation. We can almost hear America demanding, “We want what they’re having.” If Congress is serious about repealing, and replacing, the act, then that’s the sort of replacement that almost anyone could live with. Jeffrey Frank, a former senior editor of The New Yorker and the author of “Ike and Dick: Portrait of a Strange Political Marriage,” is working on a book about the
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1 week ago
Someone from Santa Monica, CA writes:
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Congress should get the same health care benefits as the rest of the population. Only then will they be motivated to improve conditions for the rest of the population.
1 week ago
Someone from Glen Burnie, MD writes:
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I have wondered about this for years. It's time we turn the tables. Maybe if they have the same benefits we have, they'd care more about making it better for everyone and not just themselves. Thank you
February 13, 2017
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